The Four Fear Melters - Video Demonstrations

More candy for those kinesthetic or body-based learners out there.

Here are four easy to use fear melters designed by Dr. Kathlyn Hendricks to help navigate fear in the moment.

  1. Flee - When you feel like you want to exit the building (e.g. public speaking), try rooting your feet into the ground like a redwood tree.
  2. Freeze - When you notice yourself frozen and you stop breathing, simply wiggle and shake it off.
  3. Fight - When you notice the urge to react quickly or fight, breathe and move slowly. 
  4. Faint - When you faint and go numb, that is an indication that it's time to welcome your fear. 

All of these were designed to interrupt the fear response pattern. For examples, go ahead and watch the videos below. 

Cheers - The Good Startups Team 

Flee > Redwood

Freeze > Shake it off 

Fight > Slow Motion

Faint > Lean in & Welcome

Appreciation Fuels Achievement

Appreciation is a powerful way to move out of fear and into creativity. That’s because it moves the attention from ourselves and onto something or someone else that we value. Developing a robust practice of appreciation is a powerful tool for maintaining creativity and productivity in the face of challenging or new situations. Plus, it’s a great way to increase connection with others.

Here’s how you can move from fear to appreciation:

  • First, notice when you are feeling stuck, anxious, procrastinating or out or sorts — chances are it’s fear creeping up on you.
  • Then, take a big, slow breath and think or something you appreciate. It helps if it’s something you are directly experiencing in the moment. So instead of thinking about last summer’s vacation trip, notice the comfort of the chair you're sitting in, or the passionate way your colleague is defending her position, or the feel of your sweater on your arms.
  • Tune in for a moment on the specifics of what you appreciate about this thing, not just a general “that’s awesome” moment, but get really granular.
  • After a moment or two or that, give a big exhale and move on.
  • Notice if you feel any different.
  • Repeat as often as you like.

Practice Self Compassion

In today’s video, I’m going to talk about the importance of cultivating self-compassion, or being kind to yourself when you’d otherwise be your own worst enemy.

We all make mistakes from time to time - it’s inevitable. It turns out that even thriving companies experience loads of failure, but they do one thing very differently. They learn from it and move on.

When I was a kid, my mom taught me the golden rule: “Do to others only that which you would want done to yourself.”

Now, seeing that I used to treat my friends and coworkers better than I would treat myself, I’ve taken to heart the diamond rule: “Do to yourself only that which you would want done to others.”

How do you speak to others when they make a mistake? How do you speak to yourself? Notice these differences and start removing any psychological blocks of unkindness that you deliver to yourself. Your company, family, and society will thank you for it.

Things You Cannot Control

There are two types of things in the world: things you can control and things that are out of your control. Seems obvious, but we notice that most entrepreneurs spend a lot of time and energy on things they cannot control: interest rates, the competition, customers’ budget limits, etc.

This is a waste of time and energy. So it’s worth getting clear on what you can and cannot reasonably control and then putting your attention only on what you can affect.

When we first heard this from Gay and Katie Hendricks, it seemed too simple to be meaningful, but then we tried this exercise and it made sense:

First, get two sheets of paper. At the top of one, write in big, bold letters: Things I CAN Control. At the top of the other write in equally large letters: Things I CANNOT Control. 

Next, make a list on each sheet. The things you can control are things like your spending, how many hours you work, whom you hire, when you launch a new product, etc. This are things under your direct control. The things you can’t control are pretty much everything else — other people’s actions, what they think of you or your company, etc.

Third, review your lists. 

Fourth, get a lighter and set fire to the list labeled “Things I CANNOT Control.” (Do this in a safe place.)

Finally, start working on the things on the other list. That is your work. Enjoy it.

 

Fear Friendly Culture

 
fearitfaceit1-1024x978.jpg
 

What does it look like when your organization or team stops running away from fear and instead embraces it in a healthy way? It’s different for everyone, but here are some things we’ve seen in the groups that lean into fear instead of run away from it:

 
  • People are open with their feelings, readily sharing when they are feeling afraid or frustrated or anxious or angry.
  • Nobody reads too much into this — hearing a colleague say she’s feeling afraid is just another piece of information, something to learn from, not run from
  • Teams and individuals learn from their fear, knowing that it asks them important questions like: Are we fully prepared for what we are about to do? Did we overlook anything? 
  • People know that fear is a natural part of doing new things.
  • Mistakes are always opportunities for learning and growth.
  • The organization supports people to take chances by making sure failure is acceptable. People are not penalized for trying and falling short. Learning from failure becomes the most important outcome, not assigning blame.
  • People take chances and know that it’s OK to fall short, so long as they learn from the experience so they don't make the same mistake twice.
  • There is little to none micro-managing because leaders trust others to do their best and they aren’t afraid of mistakes.

How many of these things do you see in your organization? 

The Culture of Unworthiness

Hello Creators of Goodness,

This video discusses my greatest learning as an entrepreneur and human being.

Today we are posing the big question. If your company fails or you make a big mistake, will you still love and accept yourself? Any hesitation means there is work to do around the culture of unworthiness, which will unconsciously color your leadership and decision making.

Enjoy the short video and for those of you who want to go a bit deeper, below is an audio that takes the exploration to a new level. 

Cheers to your unconditional acceptance of yourself - Justin

Culture of Aversion - What are you avoiding right now?

Hello Everyone,

One of the most coveted skill sets of top entrepreneurs is their ability to face what's actually occurring and creatively adjust to their reality. This sounds simple on the surface, but the actual practice requires mental mastery. 

Watch the video above to explore a few questions that may unlock new insights for you about the roadblocks in the way of your startup's expansion. 

For those of you practicing the culture of time abundance, we invite you to take your exploration a bit deeper by listening to the audio below.

Cheers to your practice of accepting reality - The Good Startups Team 

Culture of Scarcity & Decision Making

Hello Everyone,

Where is scarcity affecting your ability to raise funding, acquire customers, or build a healthy team culture? Watch this video to dive a bit deeper, and for those of you who are not experiencing scarcity of time right now (wink), we have also included a 13-minute audio that provides a deeper exploration of the culture of scarcity in entrepreneurship. 

Cheers to your abundance - The Good Startups Team  

Three Cultures of Fear

Excerpt: Uncovering the Sources of our Anxiety

Once you recognize that what you are experiencing is most likely anxiety, the question becomes how do you release the grip of anxiety so you can operate with expanded awareness and creativity?

Milano offers that the first step toward uncovering the source of your anxiety is to pay attention to your attachments to certain outcomes and identities. “Anxiety is the fear of more fear. It’s fueled by attachment. It is rooted in the need to control the things around us to keep our reality known and safe.” Milano suggests that founders suffering from anxiety walk themselves through these questions:

  • What expectation, idea, or outcome are you attached to? A specific investor? A specific client? A certain type of product working? Being cash positive in six months?

  • What identity is driving the attachment? Have you created an image of yourself as the next game-changing entrepreneur to investors, the press, and your team?

Consider this example: A founder tells her investors that the company will be cash positive in six months. Then inevitable obstacles set in, and it becomes clear that goal is unattainable. It would be easy to descend into a morass of anxiety and what-ifs: Will the board let me go? Will the team start questioning my leadership?

A leader who has practiced uncovering their attachments, on the other hand, can see things in a more productive way. “The healthy thing to do is acknowledge the attachment to a certain outcome, soften your grip on it, and use your creativity to design a new path based on reality,” says Milano. “You get to what's really true and face what's actually happening. Then you can say to your team, from a place of integrity and clear-headedness, ‘Looks like it won’t be six months. Looks more like 12 months. Now that we know that, here’s what we’re doing about it.’”

Attachment to identities can be harder to relinquish, but it’s critical to consider. Many founders, whether through their own strategy or the attention of the press, assume the mantle of “the next big thing.” Suddenly, they’re not just building a product and running a company, they’re living up to very public expectations. “Now if your product launch isn't working very well, it starts to threaten that identity. Not only is your product broken, but you’re a fraud, a common human fear.

That’s one of entrepreneurs’ biggest fears: I went out there, I sold all these friends and investors on the next big thing, and it didn’t work. I’m a fraud.

“What this speaks to is the power of humility,” says Milano. The most inspirational leaders know that it’s not about them. They acknowledge challenges and respect the competition, and they are prepared for ups and downs. And importantly, they communicate this to their team and investors. “They say, ‘This isn't about me. This is about all of us collectively working together to achieve this beautiful mission. We’re going to face some bumps along the way, and what’s important is we navigate them together, as a team and a board.’

Cordaro adds, “It’s important to know that it’s ok to have certain identities, it’s totally natural and part of being human. Just know that all these identities come with hidden expectations that can add up quickly. It’s much more pleasant to make decisions as a leader from a place of what’s best for the company and society, as opposed to maintaining a personal identity.”

Once Milano and Cordaro support their clients in identifying their unconscious attachments and identities, they go a few layers deeper into the three main sources of fear, which they call “the three cultures of fear.”

  • The Culture of Scarcity: The belief system that there’s not enough resources (e.g. time, money, etc.).

  • The Culture of Aversion: The belief system that says “I’m having the wrong experience,” or “I shouldn’t be feeling this emotion.” (e.g. shame, guilt, etc.)

  • The Culture of Unworthiness: The belief system that “I’m not enough, just the way I am.”

The Culture of Scarcity is familiar to most entrepreneurs who are often scraping by financially or working 16 hours per day to achieve the next big thing. In relation to time scarcity, Cordaro says, “What’s interesting is that Silicon Valley is one of the most abundant places on the planet in regards to financial resources, yet when it comes to time, it is one of the most impoverished places on the planet.”

Milano and Cordaro offer that the Culture of Scarcity is a myth, deeply rooted in unconscious societal programming that can be transformed with awareness and new habits. This practice is important according to Cordaro because “when scarcity dominates, selfishness, hypercompetition, and creative stagnancy do too. When abundance dominates, generosity, cooperation, and rapid transformation are there too.”

When working with clients, Milano and Cordaro take people deep into their individual scarcity programming to write new, more empowering stories for their lives.

Reject the Culture of Aversion

Cordaro notes that the goal should never be to eliminate fear, but rather to acknowledge and accept it. He sees the same pattern unfold with all the entrepreneurs he coaches: First comes a great idea, and the drive to make it a reality. “It's very exciting and really fun. It's very desire and creativity-driven.” Then they start actually building a company, and things get in the way — and anxiety sets in. “Now there are things that are getting in the way of my vision; there are things that are coming up against these visions I have for how I want the world to be. Fear is a natural part of this process.”

Adopt this mindset, and fear stops looking like a threat; it’s merely part of the package.

In Milano and Cordaro’s experience, the following shift in mindset can have a profound influence on founders. When a product fails, when the new app gets two stars in the App Store, when funding isn’t coming through, successful founders don’t get caught up thinking, “This is the wrong experience. This isn’t the way it’s supposed to be.” Instead, they accept those obstacles as part of their experience — the only one they can and should be having. They use the experience as a growth opportunity to become better, stronger, and more inspirational leaders.

“When your product isn’t working, you need that feedback in order to actually create a product that people do want,” says Milano.

“Every time you're experiencing fear and anxiety, there's information and data that wants to be uncovered.”

Anxiety lets you know when you need to kick into gear. The problem, Milano notes, is when you simply stew in anxiety all day, every day. These emotions will not serve you well if they become chronic. And where there is chronic anxiety, there is almost always avoidance or aversion.

That app with the two-star rating? Customers don’t like it — it needs to change. “The person with a healthy relationship with fear can say, ‘This is what's happening. I'm going to accept that, embrace that, and receive the information. Now what can I do creatively to solve this?’” says Milano. Leaders with an unhealthy relationship to fear, on the other hand, often lose the opportunity to course-correct. Stuck on how things “should” go, they miss the valuable signal that it’s time to pivot.

Moreover, avoiding feelings of fear only prolongs them. “All emotions are here to provide us with information about the world around us. That's why we've evolved to feel them. Emotions are data; they’ve helped us survive for tens of thousands of generations. If we're not listening to an emotion, if we're not receiving that data fully, it's going to keep coming,” says Cordaro. When you allow yourself to fully feel and accept an emotion, it dissipates very quickly, often in as little as 30 to 90 seconds.

Seen that way, accepting fear isn’t just a nice idea — it’s a serious competitive advantage. That broken product or low-rated app isn’t going to fix itself. But you can effectively halve all of your problems by listening to your fear and letting it go. Cordaro asks: “As an entrepreneur, do you want to double every single problem that you have, or do you just want to deal with the things that actually need to be worked on?”

Be an example for your team: Entrepreneurship is a roller coaster. Let’s accept that and fix what we can. There will be no freaking out.

Develop an Unshakeable Sense of Self Worth

The final culture of fear is the Culture of Unworthiness. “This one goes beyond entrepreneurship, it is an epidemic of the human species,” says Milano. The belief system is that “I’m not enough just the way I am, I need to achieve something extraordinary to generate fulfillment.” This is the culture that had hit Milano the hardest so many years ago.

Often when Milano asks his clients if they are looking to prove something to themselves, their family, or society by building their company, the answer is a quick, reactive ‘no.’ “Most people are not consciously aware of how powerful the Culture of Unworthiness is until they make a major mistake or ‘fail.’ I certainly wasn’t aware of it.”

Milano offers that one of the quickest ways to determine if you have some work to do around your own sense of worthiness is to ask yourself the question “If my company completely fails and I fall flat on my face, will I still love and accept myself unconditionally.” When Cordaro and Milano ask this question in their virtual group coaching sessions you can often see people stop breathing even through the video conferencing technology. "It’s a powerful and shaking experience," Milano says.

We live in an entrepreneurial culture that “glorifies entrepreneurs as modern gods,” says Cordaro. “We worship those who achieve impossible tasks and create things that few have only dreamed of, kind of like what Elon Musk is doing with electric vehicles and clean energy. These are extraordinary people, for sure, but when we pin all of our self-worth on becoming exactly like them, however, we’re asking for trouble.”

“When we are faced with the loss of our dreams and ideals, a natural response is a feeling of low self worth,” says Milano. For him, this was the greatest gift of his food waste startup failure.

“Through that experience I was forced to marinate in my feelings of failure and low self worth, and learn the vitally important lesson that no success and achievement will ever fill the gap of self worth within," he says. "No expensive houses, shiny cars, or flashy press headlines will ever provide true fulfillment. I am now experiencing what it feels like to be of service and create for the sheer joy of it, without the requirement for my company to validate my self worth. In my opinion, this is one of the most important skill sets an entrepreneur can cultivate.”

Through that experience, Milano now leads his clients into their unique personal experiences that are the sources of their Culture of Unworthiness. “Maybe your parents didn’t tell you that you were good enough, and you’re trying to prove that you’re worthy,” he says. Other times, the sabotaging hang-ups are professional in nature — the traumatic experience of having been fired as CEO is a prime example, and now you want to prove you can be CEO.”

In Cordaro’s experience as a psychologist, learning to conduct this sort of self-enquiry can be transformative for founders. “One of the most powerful things that I've seen people do is simply develop a curiosity about who they are and why they behave the way that they do,” he says. “It’s that kind of attitude that allows people to be the most impactful they can possibly be in society.”

How is Fear Effecting Your Leadership Culture?

Are you choosing to be a leader who acts like a hero, that you don't need support with key decisions or tasks? If so you’re not only on the fast track to burnout, but you’re also limiting your team’s development by robbing them of the opportunity to lean in and solve key problems.

You have the opportunity to shift this right now, and get on a more sustainable footing with your challenges and your team.

The way to do this is by letting everyone on the team take their 100 percent responsibility for whatever is happening. Here’s how it works: In fear-based leadership cultures, responsibility is something that is assigned and divided up. For any given task, certain people are responsible for a certain portion of the task. And, if this go wrong, well, they get to share in the blame.

In healthy teams, responsibility is not assigned or divided, it’s claimed by everyone with an interest in the outcome. Each person involved in the task has a different role, but each person has 100 percent responsibility for their role and for doing what they can to create success.

Leaders often believe that since they are the leader, they should take more of the responsibility. This leads them to take more than 100 percent, while others get to take less. To get out of hero mode, ask yourself where you are taking more than your 100 percent responsibility and then who is going to have to take on more so that everyone is only taking 100 percent. 

How are Identities Affecting Your Fundraising Strategy?

Hello Everyone,

Today I want to talk about how your identifications can affect your fundraising strategy.

One thing I've noticed when working with entrepreneurs is that often times we have these big ideals and goals to be that next game changing entrepreneur. Many entrepreneurs want to be the next Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, etc. Or they want to work with the big funds like Andreessen Horowitz, Sequoia Capital, and other top funds that get all the press headlines.

Often times our attachment to our own game changing identification as an entrepreneur - or our attachments to certain funders or investors - can significantly limit us from finding the right investors for our company. Today we want you to take a realistic view of where you are as a company.

  • Your stage of company
  • How far along you are
  • Have you established product market fit
  • The type of enterprise that you are
  • Etc.

With this information, we invite you to wonder about "where are the places that I can find money or capital that is most aligned with where I am now?" This is going to save you time and it's going to open you up to creative possibilities that maybe you weren't thinking about.

As we let go of our own identifications of ourselves and open up to what is best for our companies, we may just find the perfect investors have been there all along. You might also realize you don't need to fundraise at all, and your chance of being cash positive is staring at you like a jaguar through the leaves of the Amazon jungle.  

Cheers to your financial sustainability - The Good Startups Team

 

How Expectations Affect Decision Making

Hello Everyone,

Here's an important question to ask yourself as the leader of your company. How are my expectations for how I think things "should be" affecting the decisions I make each day? 

When we are working with leaders, often times one of the biggest challenges we face is the leader's pre-conceived ideals and expectations. The leaders have certain visions for how they want the world to be, and when things get in the way of those visions, it causes them suffering and further challenges.

Today we invite you to try on something different. We'd like you to experiment and flow with whatever's occurring in your company, and try letting go of your expectations and outcomes for how you think things should be. Instead, open up to "how do things want to be?" What actually wants to happen here?

Are there some new customers that maybe you're not thinking of? Is there a new investor who wants to come in right now that's more aligned with your type of business? 

These are important questions to ask. Often times by questioning our deepest assumptions, we generate strong breakthroughs and see a whole different path for the company to move forward that is often the path to expansion, growth and better overall alignment with your mission.

Your ability to let go of your attachments will dramatically improve your decision-making, one of your greatest entrepreneurial skill sets. 

Cheers to new creative possibilities - The Good Startups Team

How Identities Shape Us

Hello Everyone,

This is courageous work. Today we invite you to release the identities that you have unconsciously (or consciously) created about yourself.  

Have you created the image that you are the next game-changing entrepreneur like Steve Jobs or Elon Musk? 

Have you created the identity that you are a brilliant leader who always knows the answers?

Perhaps you are the successful golden boy of the family.

As Dan likes to remind us, its ok to identify, but just know that with every identity comes a set of hidden expectations that we need to live into. The goal is not to create any unnecessary boxes for ourselves, and to instead be adaptable and open to new possibilities at all times.

What identities could you let go of that would free you up to create at the highest level? A powerful question to ponder. 

Cheers - The Good Startups Team

What Are Some Attachments That You Could Release?

Hello Everyone,

Uncovering your attachments and releasing their grip on you is courageous work. Below is an excerpt from our article in First Round Capital's Review to help you wonder into what attachments you currently have that are blocking you and your company from moving forward?

Here is the link to the complete article

Uncovering the Sources of our Anxiety

Once you recognize that what you are experiencing is most likely anxiety, the question becomes how do you release the grip of anxiety so you can operate with expanded awareness and creativity?

Milano offers that the first step toward uncovering the source of your anxiety is to pay attention to your attachments to certain outcomes and identities. “Anxiety is the fear of more fear. It’s fueled by attachment. It is rooted in the need to control the things around us to keep our reality known and safe.” Milano suggests that founders suffering from anxiety walk themselves through these questions:

  • What expectation, idea, or outcome are you attached to? A specific investor? A specific client? A certain type of product working? Being cash positive in six months?

  • What identity is driving the attachment? Have you created an image of yourself as the next game-changing entrepreneur to investors, the press, and your team?

Consider this example: A founder tells her investors that the company will be cash positive in six months. Then inevitable obstacles set in, and it becomes clear that goal is unattainable. It would be easy to descend into a morass of anxiety and what-ifs: Will the board let me go? Will the team start questioning my leadership?

A leader who has practiced uncovering their attachments, on the other hand, can see things in a more productive way. “The healthy thing to do is acknowledge the attachment to a certain outcome, soften your grip on it, and use your creativity to design a new path based on reality,” says Milano. “You get to what's really true and face what's actually happening. Then you can say to your team, from a place of integrity and clear-headedness, ‘Looks like it won’t be six months. Looks more like 12 months. Now that we know that, here’s what we’re doing about it.’”

Attachment to identities can be harder to relinquish, but it’s critical to consider. Many founders, whether through their own strategy or the attention of the press, assume the mantle of “the next big thing.” Suddenly, they’re not just building a product and running a company, they’re living up to very public expectations. “Now if your product launch isn't working very well, it starts to threaten that identity. Not only is your product broken, but you’re a fraud, a common human fear.

That’s one of entrepreneurs’ biggest fears: I went out there, I sold all these friends and investors on the next big thing, and it didn’t work. I’m a fraud.

“What this speaks to is the power of humility,” says Milano. The most inspirational leaders know that it’s not about them. They acknowledge challenges and respect the competition, and they are prepared for ups and downs. And importantly, they communicate this to their team and investors. “They say, ‘This isn't about me. This is about all of us collectively working together to achieve this beautiful mission. We’re going to face some bumps along the way, and what’s important is we navigate them together, as a team and a board.’

Cordaro adds, “It’s important to know that it’s ok to have certain identities, it’s totally natural and part of being human. Just know that all these identities come with hidden expectations that can add up quickly. It’s much more pleasant to make decisions as a leader from a place of what’s best for the company and society, as opposed to maintaining a personal identity.”

Cheers to leading without attachments - The Good Startups Team

Psychological Price of Entrepreneurship

As entrepreneurs, every day we are faced with uncertainty and risk, and when things are unknown, it’s natural to feel anxious, stressed, and overwhelmed.

But entrepreneurs are also psychologically unique. In a world where up to 90% of startups fail, the most enduring visionaries will push through, energized by the idea of experiencing freedom and success alongside the 10% who beat the odds. They’re resilient. They’re adaptable. They’re extreme risk-takers. The most successful entrepreneurs tend to run toward uncertainty and threat instead of running away.

Why? The reason, at least according to psychologists, is that successful entrepreneurs tend to have one mindset about fear that the rest of us simply don’t share, at least not to the same extent: If harnessed in the right ways, understanding our fears and anxieties can lead us to breakthrough self-discoveries, innovation, and creativity. For exceptional entrepreneurs, noticing fear is a competitive advantage; it’s an emotion that we dive into with curiosity, passion, and a hunger for exponential growth.

Let’s get real and start diving into the psychological price of entrepreneurship, so that we can move forward together and grow from all of the potential obstacles.

In the most-read article in Inc. history, Jessica Bruder perfectly captures the Psychological Price of Entrepreneurship. The journey begins with self-awareness.    

    Click here to read the article

The Best Things in Life are on the Other Side of Your Maximum Fear

Hello Courageous Creators of Good,

As we continue our exploration of anxiety, we thought you would enjoy the above video by Will Smith on Skydiving, plus the excerpt from Darren Hardy's book "The Entrepreneurial Rollercoaster."

“Oddly, it’s not even calling a stranger or making a speech that generates our fear, it’s the anticipation of doing it—which is, once again, an illusion of the mind.

In the 1960s, a researcher named Seymour Epstein got curious about skydivers. He fitted novice parachutists with heart rate monitors that measured their pulses as their plane climbed toward the release point. He found that—as you might expect—while still safe inside the plane, a jumper’s heart rate got faster and faster as the plane ascended. The higher the plane went, the higher the anxiety.

What he didn’t expect to find, however, was that once they threw themselves out the door of the plane and started hurtling toward the Earth with only a few thin cords and a glorified bedsheet to keep them from impending doom, their heart rates declined dramatically, and they admitted to quite enjoying themselves.

The most stressful part of the entire experience was the illusion of how frightening the event would be, or, in other words, the anticipation of fear. Once the reality of the event took over, the fear vanished.”

– Darren Hardy

from The Entrepreneur Roller Coaster

We love this. As the skydivers go further up and up in their plane, their heart rates match their ascent.

Then? They jump! ... And their heart rates actually goes down.

As Darren tells us: It’s the fear of fear we fear.

Cheers - The Good Startups Team

One Deep Breath

Ever get that feeling that the day is getting away from you? Or perhaps you’re beginning to feel scattered and frantic. Ever wish you could just stop for a second and get reorganized?

You don’t have to drop out of your day, take a vacation or head to the bar to regain your composure. There’s a simple and effective tool for refining focus that you have access to 24/7, for free. It’s your breath. Yup, science tells us again and again that we can use our breath to deepen focus, regain emotional balance and even enhance the quality of our thinking.

This short audio will show you how you can use your breathing to work more effectively. You can do it in just a few seconds and no one even needs to know you're doing it!

Now focused breathing is not magic, and like most new skills it requires practice to make it effective. So after listening to the audio, consider setting up a practice schedule to focus on your breathing throughout the day for a week or two, then notice what effect it’s having.

Enjoy exploring the power of your breath.